6 Ways to Motivate Yourself to Lose Weight

From using those self-help guides to picturing yourself being skinny, you might have tried quite a few strategies to lose weight. It could be that there might be some basic flaw in these techniques or it could be that you are not carrying them out correctly.

We at Blossom Hypnotherapy have outlined some ways in which you can motivate yourself to lose weight. Read on:

Visualize Both Optimistically and Realistically

Although it is good to visualize yourself losing weight, only imagining the positive results might not be a good idea. Two researchers from the University of Pennsylvania, Gabriele Oettingen and Thomas Waden, asked the participants to visualize four scenarios: two of them were related to them losing weight; whereas, the other two were about tempting situations that they might find themselves in. The study, surprisingly, showed that participants who engaged in negative fantasies lost an average of 12 kilos.

In her next study, she asked participants to think about the top two benefits of losing weight and then about top two obstacles that they might face. Visualizing both scenarios proved to be more efficient than visualizing benefits or obstacles in isolation.

Use Willpower Smartly

You might have believed that losing weight requires a lot of willpower and self-control. While this is absolutely true, things are a bit trickier.

According to Roy Baumeister, using willpower is more like using muscles. This means that using your willpower on one action might deplete it for other actions. For instance, smokers who quit smoking for 24 hours are more likely to binge on ice cream.

However, there are some ways in which the pressure on willpower can be eased. There is evidence suggesting that making a public commitment towards any goal increases the likelihood of the person staying on course. By doing this, the person not only receives support from friends and family members, but also wants to avoid the embarrassment of failing after making the announcement.

Look at Role Model’s Story Instead of Just a Photograph for Weight Loss Motivation

Richard Wiseman, a British psychologist carried out an experiment to see why some people remain motivated for certain goals and why some do not. When it came to weight loss, the psychologist found that putting a picture of celebrity on their fridge’s door did not help much. A good role model is somebody people can relate to. They get motivated by them when they read their autobiographies or watch their interviews.

Create Sub-Goals that are Concrete, Measurable and Time-Based

When it comes to losing weight, there is always fear and hesitation as it would mean adopting major lifestyle changes. People who divide this goal into specific, measurable and time-based sub-goals tend to have a higher success rate.

Use Regret to Your Advantage

Sometimes, when people fail to accomplish the desired effect, they tend to become too harsh on themselves. The right way to use the power of regret is defined by Charles Abraham and Paschal Sheeran. In one study, they demonstrated that thinking about the regret that participants will experience after indulging in an unhealthy behavior can stop them from indulging in the first place.

Stick to Weight Loss Diet Plan

A healthy diet consists of the right amount of fruits, vegetable and other foods. However, planning the diet is just job half done. To experience benefits, one has to stick to it. Keeping a food journal might help. A research published in the US National Library of Medicine shows that people who keep a food journal are two times more likely to lose weight than people who do not.

Rekha Shrivastava, at Blossom Hypnotherapy, offers a variety of weight loss programs for her clients in Rochester, New York. Visit the website for a free consultation.

Sources

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11374746

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1308011/

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/225611430_Implications_of_goal_theories_for_the_Theories_of_Reasoned_Action_and_Planned_Behaviour

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2515566/

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